About Czech Republic

The Czech Republic or Česká republika, also called by its short-form name, Czechia, is a landlocked country in Central Europe bordered by Austria, Germany, Poland and Slovakia.
The Czech Republic has hilly landscape that covers an area of 78,866 square kilometers (30,450 sq mi) with a mostly temperate continental oceaninc climate, with warm summers and cold, cloudy and snowy winters.
It is a unitary parliamentary republic. It has ranked as one of the safest or most peaceful countries for the past few decades. It is a member of the United Nations, the European Union, NATO, OECD, Council of Europe and is an observer to the Organization of American States.

About Czech Republic

The Czech Republic or Česká republika, also called by its short-form name, Czechia, is a landlocked country in Central Europe bordered by Austria, Germany, Poland and Slovakia.
The Czech Republic has hilly landscape that covers an area of 78,866 square kilometers (30,450 sq mi) with a mostly temperate continental oceaninc climate, with warm summers and cold, cloudy and snowy winters.
It is a unitary parliamentary republic. It has ranked as one of the safest or most peaceful countries for the past few decades. It is a member of the United Nations, the European Union, NATO, OECD, Council of Europe and is an observer to the Organization of American States.

Short Histrory

The Duchy of Bohemia under Great Moravia in 1002 was formally recognized as an Imperial State of the Holy Roman Empire, and became the Kingdom of Bohemia in 1198. Following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, the whole Crown of Bohemia was gradually integrated into the Habsburg Monarchy. The Protestant Bohemian Revolt led to the Thirty Years’ War. After the Battle of the White Mountain, the Habsburgs consolidated their rule. With the dissolution of the Holy Empire in 1806, the Crown lands became part of the Austrian Empire.
In the 19th century, the Czech lands became more industrialized and were part of the First Czechoslovak Republic following the collapse of the Austria-Hungary after World War I. After the Munich Agreement in 1938, Nazi Germany systematically took control over the Czech lands. Czechoslovakia was restored in 1945 until 1 January 1993 when it dissolved, with its constituent states becoming the independent states of the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

Czechia’s Economy

The Czech Republic is a developed country with an advanced, high income social market economy. It is a welfare state with a European social model and universal health care.
The Czech Republic participates in the European Single Market as a member of the European Union, but uses its own currency, the Czech koruna, instead of the euro.
It’s per capita GDP rate is 91% of the EU average. As of 2018, the country’s GDP per capita at purchasing power parity is $37,370 and $22,850 at nominal value. According to Allianz A.G., in 2018 the country was an MWC (mean wealth country), ranking 26th in net financial assets. It ranks 13th in the UN inequality-adjusted human development and 14th in World Bank Human Capital Index. It was described by The Guardian as “one of Europe’s most flourishing economies”.

The industrial sector accounts for 37.5% of the economy, while services account for 60% and agriculture for 2.5%. The largest trading partner for both export and import is Germany and the EU in general. The country has been a member of the Schengen Area since 1 May 2004, having abolished border controls, completely opening its borders with all of its neighbors on 21 December 2007.

The Czech universal health care system is similar in quality to other developed nations and is based on a compulsory insurance model, with fee-for-service care funded by mandatory employment-related insurance plans.

Czechia – a Safe Country

Czech Republic is very safe to travel to, the crime rates are very low, and even pickpocketing is not that common. It ranks as the 7th safest and most peaceful country and 32nd in democratic governance.

Higher Education in Czechia

At present there are 26 public universities, 10 private universities, 2 state universities and colleges, and 6 for-profit private universities in Czech Republic.
Charles University in Prague is the oldest university in Central Europe founded in 1348. It is also
one of the oldest universities in Europe that still provides education.

Work of study in Czech Republic is graded according to the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). This makes it very easy to transfer grades and/or degree(s) both to and from Czech Republic. The academic year in practice stretches from September to June and is divided into two semesters.

Czech universities offer a lot of extracurricular activities: soccer, jogging, running, volleyball, cyclings, swimming, and during winter ice skating on rivers and pond hockey, singing in choirs which enriches language skills, volunteering – students can join groups working on immigrant integration and cultural heritage protection.

Working in Czechia

According to the Czech Labour Code, an expat needs to obtain a work permit in order to work in the country. There are exceptions, the work permit is not required in case of:

  • Citizens of the EU countries, Switzerland, Norway, Lichtenstein, and Iceland or family members of citizens of such countries;
  • Foreigners who have a permanent residence permit in the Czech Republic;
  • Foreigners staying in the Czech Republic based on a long-term residence permit;
  • Students engaged in full-time studies;
  • Individuals who finished high school or university studies in the Czech Republic.

However, this doesn’t apply for those wishing to work in the Czech Republic as employees without being an EU citizen or member of any other exempted group either. In such a case, having a work permit (“povolení k zaměstnání”) or a long-term residence permit (“povolení k dlouhodobému pobytu”) is required along with a visa issued for work purposes.

Czechs – how are they like?

The Czechs are generally considered to be cordial, friendly, jovial, and, above all, very hospitable people. All Czechs love music which is also reflected in their saying A co Čech to muzikant (The Czech – The musician). And there is hardly a Czech who does not like to sing.

On the other hand, they are realistic, have industrious nature, technical skills, organizational ability, exactness, and punctuality. The Czechs are highly individualistic people. They believe in and support liberal causes for which they are willing to fight, but on their own terms.

Most Czechs intuitively respect education and Czech teachers have generally been held in high esteem. The fact that university professors are appointed by the President of the Republic is another indication of the importance with which education has been perceived among the Czech people. A sign of an educated household was a private library for which wealthier families reserved a special room in their house.

Czech Cuisine

The Czech Republic has a very traditional meat-and-potatoes cuisine, with dishes heavy on gravies and root vegetables. Winter is perhaps the best time to try Czech food when hearty soups take centre stage.
Svíčková na smetaně is a national meat dish that’s usually prepared for special occasions. This classic Czech meal is a quality cubeef sirloin, slowly roasted and served with vegetable puree.

Other popular national dishes are:

  • Roasted pork (Vepřo knedlo zelo)
  • Schnitzel (Řízek)
  • Baked mincemeat (Sekaná pečeně)
  • Garlic soup (Česnečka)
  • Smoked meat (Uzené)

Czech Culture and Sports

The Czech nation possesses a distinctive culture. The territory of the Czech Republic traditionally has been between the German and Slav lands, and Czech cultural traditions are a mixture of both. Influences from farther afield also have been strong. Visually the most striking influences are Italian—in Renaissance and Baroque architecture, for instance—while literature, music, the visual arts, and popular culture also are indebted to a variety of external influences.

Sports play a significant part in the life of many Czechs who are generally loyal supporters of their favourite teams or individuals. The two leading sports are football and ice hockey, both drawing the largest attention of both the media and supporters. Sport is a source of strong waves of patriotism.

Czech Nature

The Czech Republic ranks as the 27th most environmentally conscious country in the world in Environmental Performance Index.
From the valleys of the north, with its majestic cities like Prague, to its southern mountains dotted with vineyards of Moravia, the Czech Republic has much to offer the tourist.
The geography of the country is split into three major regions: Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia with four National Parks (Šumava National Park, Krkonoše National Park, České Švýcarsko National Park, Podyjí National Park) and 25 Protected Landscape Areas.

What is Czechia famous for?

Prague is the fifth most visited city in Europe after London, Paris, Istanbul and Rome.
Architectural heritage is an object of interest to visitors – there are over 1200 castles and chateaux. Moreover, Prague castle is the largest castle complex in the world with an area of 70 000 square meters.
The Czech Republic boasts 14 UNESCO World Heritage Sites. All of them are in the cultural category. As of 2018, further 18 sites are on the tentative list.

The country is well known as a haven for beer lovers, tracing its brewing history all the way back to the Břevnov Monastery in 993. Czechs host their own “Octoberfest”, known as “Beer Days”- a beer fesitval where some 6,000 pubs and restaurants across the Czech Republic take part in.

Be it its world-famous politicians, top-classs sportsmen, Nobel Prieze laureates or globally lauded writers and musicians, the Czech Republic boasts many famous natives who significantly contributed to their diverse fields.

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