About Germany

Germany, officially also known as Federal Republic of Germany is a country in Central and Western Europe, consisting of 16 constituent states and approximately 82 million inhabitants. Next to natural borders, such as Baltic and North seas to the north and Alps to the south, it also borders to Denmark, Poland, Czech Republic, Austria, Switzerland, France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and Netherlands. The latter makes it culturally rich country and a great point to start your travel all over the Europe!

About
Germany

Germany, officially also known as Federal Republic of Germany is a country in Central and Western Europe, consisting of 16 constituent states and approximately 82 million inhabitants. Next to natural borders, such as Baltic and North seas to the north and Alps to the south, it also borders to Denmark, Poland, Czech Republic, Austria, Switzerland, France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and Netherlands. The latter makes it culturally rich country and a great point to start your travel all over the Europe!

German Economy

The economy of Germany is a highly developed social market economy. It has the largest national economy in Europe, its GDP presents 3,17 percent of the world economy. Its current GDP per capita is 53,571 EUR, which puts Germany at 9th place on the list of European countries. Minimum wage in Germany is estimated at 1,584.00 EUR per month.

The country is one of the world’s most successful exporters: top 10 export goods are vehicles, machinery, chemical goods, electronic products, electrical equipment, pharmaceuticals, transport equipment, basic metals, food products, rubber, and plastics.

Germany – a synonym for quality

If a thing or product lasts and it is good quality, then it must be German production. German products have an amazing reputation in good quality, since the production relies on high standards, professionals, good education and materials.

Higher education in Germany

Germany is known for a great investment in their educational system. General school system is divided into five levels: early, primary, secondary, tertiary, and continuing education.
Tertiary education in Germany is available to anyone who has finished secondary education in Germany or abroad. Germans, thorough as always, offer various tertiary educational institutions, each one of them offering professional education. The most known of all are state universities and colleges, which are open to everyone who meets the entrance requirements and has all necessary documents.

You can find more than 300 state run educational institutions, among them are approximately 100 classical universities, more than 165 universities of applied sciences, and over 50 colleges of art, music and film in Germany.

In addition to state run institutions, there are also private educational institution and many of them offer by state accredited study programs.

Working in Germany

EU citizens have the right to seek work in Germany without the need for a work permit. They are treated in the same way as German residents in terms of access to the employment market, working conditions and social and tax advantages.
Non-EU graduates, so-called international students in Germany, who finished their studies in Germany are similarly eligible to get lawful employment within the country.
There is demand, among others, for doctors, nursing staff, engineers, mechatronic technicians, IT specialists and train drivers.

Germany offers an amazing view

With its size of 357 022 km2, it offers everything: from sea, mountains, emerald green lakes to deep green forests, which cover one-fifth of the total land area. Germany is famous for various natural wonders, for example Blautopf lake, Lüneburg Heath, amazing cliffs on the island of Rügen, Triberg Waterfalls, Wadden see and many natural caves.

Germany – perfect spot for history and cultural enthusiasts

For all those not really interested in its nature, Germany offers its visitors a great insight into the Central European history.
One can see everything, from the past Roman Empire, Middle Age migrations, heart of European first printed words, Martin Luther and Protestant Reformation and First and Second World War.
However, Germany is still most famous for Cold War division of state and today’s main city Berlin into four sectors, later two parts, West and East, each of them almost presenting its own country within a country. Berlin Wall, separating those two parts in length of 155 km, represents one of the most important world monuments. Brandenburg Gate in height of 19 m on the second hand, is also a great monument, which symbolizes the reunification of previously separated parts of Germany.

German Cuisine

When talking German Cuisine, we can’t not mention its rich tradition of sausages (German: Wurst). Most common is certainly Bratwurst, closely following by Wiener, Blutwurst and Currywurst, taking its place on each bigger festival or event.

North of the country is famous for its herring, which used to be local’s main dish in the past.

Talking sweet side of cuisine, Germans are most famous for Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte (black forest cake) and Berliner (special donut). One can not forget famous German beer, which got its own festival Oktoberfest in München.

For all sports enthusiast

Germany is also famous for its sport activities. Who does not know FC Bayern, FB Borussia and RB Salzburg. The most famous German football player remains Franz Beckenbauer. Next to football Germans are also famous for golf (Martin Kaymer), ice hokey (Uwe Krupp), basketball (Detlef Schrempf, Dirk Nowitzki).

In case you’re more into racing, you certainly know Michael Schumacher and Sebastian Vettel, both responsible for the world recognition of Formula 1.

Winter sports fans know also famous German ski stars, such as Markus Wasmeier.

What are German people like?

It is true that many Germans tend to place punctuality as a high priority. Hence the global observation that German trains often run perfectly on time.

German people tend to be thrifty, be sensible, and respect one another’s privacy, and they typically respect the structure and laws of society to an above-average degree. There is no place that this sense of ‘order’ is more apparent than in German business culture.

Traditionally, German people tie a lot of importance to notions of family and community. Regarding the latter, this is partially where the well-known ‘rule-following’ and orderly nature of the German people comes from: if everyone in the community follows the rules and does things the right way, the neighborhood/town/city/country will be a nice place for all residents to live.

Get a Free Consultation


Privacy Policy

CONTACT US

and get a free consultation from a specialist



Privacy Policy

Checking this box is required to send your message!

Checking this box is required to send your message!

Apply for Training

in Slovakia!





Privacy Policy

×

Get a Free Consultation


Privacy Policy

х

Apply for a residence
permit in the European Union!





Privacy Policy

×
Get link to e-mail





x

CONTACT US

and get a free consultation from a specialist



Privacy Policy

Checking this box is required to send your message!

Checking this box is required to send your message!

×

Get a Free Consultation


Privacy Policy

х